Cyber Strategies for a World at War

OPEN SOURCE AGGREGATION & ANALYSIS

The Latest Security Firm “Tell all”

On the heels of Mandiant’s international sensation APT1: Exposing One of China’s Cyber Espionage Units, we now have the Symantec report flamboyantly entitled Stuxnet 0.5: The Missing Link.

Have we now entered an era where Security Firms need to reveal their secrets in order to stay relevant and, perhaps more importantly, attract new customers? Or is it that these Security Firms regard more openness by them as better for the overall health and security of the cyber world than keeping their secrets secret?

Read the Symantec report:
Stuxnet 0.5: The Missing Link

Filed under: Business, cyber security, cyber war, government, Intelligence Community, Internet, Politics, SCADA, Stuxnet, Technology, Threats, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Attorney General Eric Holder Speaks at the Administration Trade Secret Strategy Rollout

Department of Justice
February 20, 2013

Thank you, Victoria, for those kind words – and thank you all for being here. It’s a pleasure to welcome you to the White House today – and a privilege to stand with so many friends, key partners, and indispensable allies in introducing the Administration’s strategy for combating the theft of trade secrets.

As Victoria just mentioned, this work is a top priority for President Obama, for the entire Administration – and of course for the dedicated men and women at the Department of Justice. I’m deeply proud of the contributions that my colleagues have made in developing this strategy – and the pivotal role that the Department will play in its implementation. And I’m confident that – as we bring government agencies and additional private sector partners together to put these plans into action – we’ll continue strengthening national efforts to protect the rights, safety, and best interests of American consumers, innovators, and entrepreneurs.

Particularly in this time of ongoing economic recovery, this work is more important than ever. Despite the challenges of recent years, American companies remain the most innovative in the world. They are responsible for many of the most important technological advances the world has ever seen, an overwhelming number of the 100 most valuable brands, and almost 30 percent of global research and development spending.

This level of innovation and the investments that make it possible benefit consumers, create jobs, and support our economy. For instance, in 2011, companies in Silicon Valley added over 42,000 jobs and recorded a growth rate more than three times that of the U.S. economy as a whole. But, as any of the corporate leaders in this crowd can attest, this prosperity is a double-edged sword. And it inevitably attracts global rivals – including individuals, companies, and even countries – eager to tilt the playing field to their advantage.

By corrupting insiders, hiring hackers, and engaging in other unscrupulous and illegal activities, these entities can inflict devastating harm on individual creators, start-ups, and major companies. As one private security expert has said of the largest U.S. corporations, there are only “two categories” of companies affected by trade secret theft – “[T]hose that know they’ve been compromised and those that don’t know yet.”

This is because, as new technologies have torn down traditional barriers to international business and global commerce, they’ve also made it easier for criminals to steal trade secrets – and to do so from anywhere in the world. A hacker in China can acquire source code from a software company in Virginia without leaving his or her desk. With a few keystrokes, a terminated or simply unhappy employee of a defense contractor can misappropriate designs, processes, and formulas worth billions of dollars.

Some of these criminals exploit pilfered secrets themselves – often by extorting the victim company or starting their own enterprise. Others try to sell the illicit information to a rival company, or obtain a bounty from a country interested in encouraging such theft. And all represent a significant and steadily increasing threat to America’s economic and national security interests.

Fortunately, the women and men of the Justice Department are working tirelessly to prevent, combat, and punish these serious crimes. Thanks to the efforts of 40 prosecutors and four computer forensic experts serving in the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section, and more than 230 specially-trained prosecutors stationed at U.S. Attorneys’ Offices around the country, including 25 Computer Hacking and Intellectual Property – or “CHIP” – units, I’m pleased to report that we’re fighting back more aggressively, and collaboratively, than ever before. And with approximately 240 FBI agents in the field dedicated to investigating IP crime, along with officials from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and 20 additional state, federal, and international law enforcement agencies that are partners at the IPR Center, we are poised to build on our recent successes.

I’m proud of the outstanding work that these professionals are leading every day, in offices all across the country. But I also recognize – as I know you all do – that the Justice Department won’t be able to continue making the progress we need, and that our citizens and companies deserve, on its own.

We need to increase cooperation and coordination between partners at every level of government. We need to improve engagement with the corporations represented in the room today. We need to find ways to work together more efficiently and effectively – by following the road map set forth in the Administration’s new, comprehensive strategy. And we need to do so starting immediately – because continuing technological expansion and accelerating globalization will lead to a dramatic increase in the threat posed by trade secret theft in the years ahead.

In fact, by 2015, experts believe that the number of smart phones, tablets, laptops, and other internet-access devices in use will be roughly double the total that existed in 2010. In the same period, the proliferation of cloud-based computing will significantly enhance flexibility and productivity for workers around the world. But these same forces will also create more access points and vulnerabilities that allow criminals to steal confidential information.

Just as increasing globalization will enable American companies of all sizes to benefit from foreign technical experts and research and development activities in other countries, the sharing of trade secrets with entities operating in nations with weak rule of law may expose them to intellectual property losses. Any resulting cost advantages will likely be more than offset by losses in proprietary company information.

Unfortunately, these projections aren’t merely hypothetical. We’ve seen this phenomenon before – including in the late 1990s, when I had the privilege of serving as Deputy Attorney General. Between 1997 and 2000, internet usage in the United States more than doubled – and this massive technological shift also brought about major changes in the nature of crime. For instance, in 1999 alone, we saw a 30-percent spike in intellectual property cases over the previous year. In order to fight back, in July of that year I announced the Department’s first major IP Strategy, known as the Intellectual Property Rights Initiative.

Of course, we’ve all come a long way since then. As critical technologies have advanced, criminals have adapted accordingly. Our need to keep pace with these changes remains imperative. And the stakes have never been higher.

In some industries, a single trade secret can be worth millions – or even billions – of dollars. Trade secret theft can require companies to lay off employees, to close factories, to lose sales and profits, to experience a decline in competitive position and advantage – or even to go out of business. And this type of crime can have significant impacts not only on our country’s economic well-being, but on our national security – allowing hostile states to obtain data and technology that could endanger American lives; expose our energy, financial, or other sensitive sectors to massive losses; or make our infrastructure vulnerable to attack.

In response, the Justice Department has made the investigation and prosecution of trade secret theft a top priority. This is why the National Security Division’s Counterespionage Section has taken a leading role in economic espionage cases – and others affecting national security and the export of military and strategic commodities or technology. It’s also why, in 2010, I established an internal Task Force on Intellectual Property – led by Deputy Attorney General Jim Cole and other senior Department leaders – to improve and expand our enforcement efforts in this area. And it’s why the FBI has increased its focus on trade secret theft and its use of sophisticated tools and techniques in conducting national security and criminal investigations.

Of course, most trade secret matters are dealt with in civil court. But when the Justice Department receives referrals, we investigate and, when appropriate, prosecute those matters fairly and completely. And, although the primary legislation creating criminal liability for these acts is less than 20 years old, federal law enforcement officials have established a remarkable record of success in this area.

In the decade between 2001 and 2011, we secured well over 100 convictions in cases involving criminal trade secret thefts, and 6 convictions in economic espionage cases. For instance, in December 2011, a federal court in Indiana sentenced a man from China to more than 7 years in prison – after his conviction on charges of economic espionage on behalf of a foreign university tied to the Chinese government. Last September – in New Jersey – a jury convicted another Chinese native of trade secret theft and other charges for stealing information from a defense contractor about the performance and guidance systems for missiles and other military hardware. And last November – in Michigan – a former General Motors engineer and her husband were convicted of conspiring to steal more than $40 million worth of trade secrets from GM, with intent to use them in a joint venture with an automotive competitor in China.

In these and many other cases – as we’ve refined our approach and increased our understanding of these crimes and those who commit them – the Department has also gathered valuable intelligence about foreign-based economic espionage. We’ve forged strong relationships with law enforcement partners, private sector experts, and international allies. And we’ve begun to raise awareness about the devastating impact of these crimes – and to encourage companies to report suspected breaches to law enforcement – so violators can be caught, brought to justice, and kept from striking again.

As we carry this work into the future – thanks to the support and assistance of everyone here today, and the cutting-edge strategy we’re committed to implementing – I’m confident that we’ll continue to make great strides in the fight against trade secret theft. We’ll keep improving our ability to crack down on intellectual property infringement and economic espionage. And together we’ll ensure that the United States is, and always will be, the world leader in innovation.

/////////////////

Attendees of the Justice Department announcement received copies of the following report:

FOREIGN SPIES STEALING US ECONOMIC SECRETS IN CYBERSPACE

 

Filed under: Business, China, cyber security, Doctrine, government, Internet, News, Policy, Politics, Strategy, Technology, Threats, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Former CIA Director Talks Cyber Security

Michael_Hayden,_CIA_official_portraitFormer National Security Agency and Central Intelligence Agency Director General Michael Hayden discusses life as the nation’s premier spy, as well the pressing cyber and national security issues of the day, with Frank Sesno, Director of George Washington University‘s School of Media and Public Affairs. This event took place February 19, 2013, and was recorded by CSPAN.

One of the first topics they discuss is the huge load of evidential data the information security company Mandiant recently released that alleges the Chinese government, through its military, is complicit in persistent cyber espionage against the United States government and corporations.

Not-so breaking news, folks: According to General Hayden, the United States steals China‘s secrets, too. However, he goes on to differentiate the type of espionage between the two nations. He regards the United States’s spying against the Chinese government as being done only to protect the United States’s citizens’s liberty and security; whereas the Chinese spying is being done against the United States primarily to steal its corporate and national secrets to improve China’s industrial and technological capacity and strength.

Unfortunately, CSPAN offers no embeddable file for the event so you will need to watch it at www.c-spanvideo.org/program/311052-1

Filed under: Analysis, cyber security, cyber war, Doctrine, government, Intelligence Community, Internet, Military, News, Terrorism, Threats, , , , , , , , , ,

Congressional Open Hearing: Cyber Threats and Ongoing Efforts to Protect the Nation

Mandiant’s groundbreaking report that alleges China’s government is responsible for persistent, long-term hacking and cyber espionage, has the following quote:

“China’s economic espionage has reached an intolerable level and I believe that the United States and our allies in Europe and Asia have an obligation to confront Beijing and demand that they put a stop to this piracy. Beijing is waging a massive trade war on us all, and we should band together to pressure them to stop. Combined, the United States and our allies in Europe and Asia have significant diplomatic and economic leverage over China, and we should use this to our advantage to put an end to this scourge.”

— U.S. Rep. Mike Rogers, October, 2011

Representative Rogers’ quote comes from this congressional testimony:

House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
Chairman Mike Rogers Opening Statement
Open Hearing: Cyber Threats and Ongoing Efforts to Protect the Nation
October 4, 2011

*Remarks as Prepared

Introduction: The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence meets today in open session to convene a hearing on cyber threats and ongoing efforts to protect the nation. There are a wide range of cyber issues being debated these days. I would like to focus our discussion at today’s hearing, however, on cyber information sharing, and in particular, what the Intelligence Community might be able to do to assist the private sector in defending their networks.

The Speaker has asked Congressman Mac Thornberry of this Committee to lead the efforts of the House on the broader range of important cyber security issues, and his Task Force has done some very important work in thinking through some of these difficult problems. He has the full support of the House Intelligence Committee as he does his work, and I hope this hearing will be of benefit to the work of the Task Force.

Our witnesses for today’s hearing are The Honorable Michael Hayden, Mr. Arthur Coviello, and Mr. Kevin Mandia.

General Hayden has had a very long and distinguished military career. His assignments include serving as director of the National Security Agency, and director of the Central Intelligence Agency. He also served as the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence, and he is no stranger to the significant cyber threats we face from nation states like China.

Mr. Coviello is the Executive Chairman of RSA Corporation, a company which plays an important role in helping secure both private and government networks and systems.

RSA’s business alone would probably be sufficient to qualify him to testify before the Committee on cyber, but RSA was also the target of a significant cyber attack recently, and therefore serves as a useful case study of the state of our cyber security efforts.

Mr. Kevin Mandia is the Chief Executive Officer of MANDIANT, an industry leader in cyber incident response and computer forensics. Mr. Mandia deals with the consequences of advanced cyber espionage against American companies every day, and we look forward to his observations on the threats we face, as well as what we can do to better cope with them.

Read the complete testimony at the U.S. House of Representatives website.

Filed under: Business, China, government, Intelligence Community, Internet, Politics, Technology, Threats, , , , , , , , , , ,

Mandiant Exposes Persisten Hacking Authorized By Chinese Government

Mandiant, an information security company, has been in the news lately as the go-to cybersecurity company after high profile newspapers like the New York Times, Washington Post, and others were allegedly attacked by Chinese hackers. The New York Times alleged they were attached by China in retribution for the newspaper exposing government corruption at the highest levels.

Today, Mandiant has done something unusual for the hyper-secret world of cyber espionage and counter-espionage: they went public with accusatory reports and videos that shows a “day in the life” of a typical Chinese hacker.

The following is available from Mandiant’s website:

From the report:

Since 2004, Mandiant has investigated computer security breaches at hundreds of organizations around the world. The majority of these security breaches are attributed to advanced threat actors referred to as the “Advanced Persistent Threat” (APT). We first published details about the APT in our January 2010 M-Trends report. As we stated in the report, our position was that “The Chinese government may authorize this activity, but there’s no way to determine the extent of its involvement.” Now, three years later, we have the evidence required to change our assessment. The details we have analyzed during hundreds of investigations convince us that the groups conducting these activities are based primarily in China and that the Chinese Government is aware of them.

Read the full report:
Mandiant Report

Filed under: Analysis, Business, China, cyber security, cyber war, government, Military, News, Technology, Threats, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Stuxnet: The New Face of 21st Century Cyber Warfare Infographic

Stuxnet

Infographic by Veracode Application Security

Filed under: cyber security, cyber war, government, Intelligence Community, Internet, Military, Stuxnet, Threats, War, , , ,

Global Trends

"The nature of conflict is changing. The risk of conflict will increase due to diverging interests among major powers, an expanding terror threat, continued instability in weak states, and the spread of lethal, disruptive technologies. Disrupting societies will become more common, with long-range precision weapons, cyber, and robotic systems to target infrastructure from afar, and more accessible technology to create weapons of mass destruction."
 
Global Trends and Key Implications Through 2035 from the National Intelligence Council Quadrennial Report GLOBAL TRENDS: The Paradox of Power

A World at War

The World is at War. It is a world war that is being fought right now, in real time, virtually everywhere on the planet. It is a world war that is, perhaps, more encompassing and global in nature than any other world war in history because, not only is it being fought by nations and their governments, it is also being fought by non-state actors such as terrorists, organized crime, unorganized crime, and many other known and unknown entities. It is a total world war being fought every day on the hidden and dark battle fields of the cyber domain. It is a war that, according to some intelligence estimates, has the potential to be as nearly as serious and as deadly as a nuclear war... [MORE]

 


 


ADVERTISEMENT

Author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Against All Enemies, former presidential advisor and counter-terrorism expert Richard A. Clarke sounds a timely and chilling warning about America’s vulnerability in a terrifying new international conflict—Cyber War! Every concerned American should read this startling and explosive book that offers an insider’s view of White House ‘Situation Room’ operations and carries the reader to the frontlines of our cyber defense. Cyber War exposes a virulent threat to our nation’s security. This is no X-Files fantasy or conspiracy theory madness—this is real... [MORE]

RSS ODNI News

  • NESPIN Welcomes Connecticut Intelligence Center (CTIC) to Group of Agency Systems Connected to RISSNET July 27, 2017
    By: Donald Kennedy  Aug 15, 2016   The New England State Police Information Network (NESPIN) is pleased to welcome the Connecticut Intelligence Center (CTIC) to the group of partner agency systems connected to Regional Information Sharing Systems (RISS) and sharing criminal intelligence via RISSIntel.
  • Unpacking Cyber Terrorism July 26, 2017
    By: ISE Bloggers  May 31, 2016   The Information Sharing Environment (ISE) has always been focused on terrorism-related information sharing; with terrorist groups’ ever-increasing level of sophistication in their use of the Internet, it is only natural that information sharing play a role in tackling issues posed by cyber terrorism.
  • Homeland Security Advisor Tom Bossert Discusses Global Ransomware Attack May 22, 2017
    The President's Homeland Security Advisor, Tom Bossert, briefed the press on 15 May 2017 on the WannaCry ransomware attack that began spreading 12 May and affected computers in more than 150 countries. Bossert highlighted CTIIC's role in keeping the White House informed of unfolding events and discussed US responses and public/private coordination […]
  • Homeland Security Advisor Tom Bossert Discusses Global Ransomware Attack May 22, 2017
    The President's Homeland Security Advisor, Tom Bossert, briefed the press on 15 May 2017 on the WannaCry ransomware attack that began spreading 12 May and affected computers in more than 150 countries. Bossert highlighted CTIIC's role in keeping the White House informed of unfolding events and discussed US responses and public/private coordination […]
  • DS&T AND OUSD(I) Launch “Xpress” Automated Analysis Challenge May 16, 2017
    NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ODNI News Release No. 13-17 May 15, 2017   DS&T AND OUSD(I) Launch “Xpress” Automated Analysis Challenge   WASHINGTON – The Intelligence Community is sponsoring a $500,000 prize competition to explore artificial intelligence approaches that would transform the process by which analysts currently support policymakers and […]

ADVERTISEMENT

Hackers are always pushing the boundaries, investigating the unknown, and evolving their art. Even if you don't already know how to program, Hacking: The Art of Exploitation, 2nd Edition will give you a complete picture of programming, machine architecture, network communications, and existing hacking techniques. Combine this knowledge with the included Linux environment, and all you need is your own creativity... [MORE]


ADVERTISEMENT

Web applications are the front door to most organizations, exposing them to attacks that may disclose personal information, execute fraudulent transactions, or compromise ordinary users. This practical book has been completely updated and revised to discuss the latest step-by-step techniques for attacking and defending the range of ever-evolving web applications... [MORE]

RSS NSA News


ADVERTISEMENT

“When it comes to what government and business are doing together and separately with personal data scooped up from the ether, Mr. Schneier is as knowledgeable as it gets…. Mr. Schneier’s use of concrete examples of bad behavior with data will make even skeptics queasy and potentially push the already paranoid over the edge.” (Jonathan A. Knee - New York Times)... [MORE]

RSS CIA News

  • Top Ten Reasons to Apply to the CIA Scholarship Program
    Blog Post: Did you know the CIA has scholarships for undergraduate and graduate students? Did you know you could get paid to go to school? Here are our top 10 reasons to apply to the CIA Scholarship Program.
  • Remembering CIA’s Heroes: Richard Daniel Krobock
    Feature Story: "Rare is the man who has a full life by the age of 31. Rarer still is the man who, simply through the quiet strength of his personality and the resolve of his character, can dramatically affect the lives of the people who have encountered him. Richard Daniel Krobock was that man."
  • A Day in the Life of a CIA Cyber Threat Analyst Intern
    Featured Story: Every officer has a unique path to the Agency, and CIA interns are no exception. CIA.gov recently sat down with a Cyber Threat Analyst Intern in the Directorate of Analysis (DA) to learn more about her journey to the CIA and her experiences during her summer internships. She is back this summer for her second tour with the Agency and looks fo […]
  • Director Pompeo Delivers Remarks at INSA
    Speech: Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by CIA Director Mike Pompeo at INSA Leadership Dinner (July 11, 2017)
  • A Day in the Life of a CIA Scholarship Recipient
    Featured Story: The CIA Undergraduate Scholarship program is a financial needs based initiative that offers undergraduate students an unmatched experience in a diverse and inclusive environment. Undergraduate students, serving as scholarship recipients with the CIA, attend an accredited college/university on a full-time basis, studying a variety of subjects, […]

ADVERTISEMENT

The Blue Team Handbook is a zero fluff reference guide for cyber security incident responders and InfoSec pros alike. The BTHb includes essential information in a condensed handbook format about the incident response process, how attackers work, common tools, a methodology for network analysis developed over 12 years, Windows and Linux analysis processes, tcpdump usage examples, Snort IDS usage, and numerous other topics... [MORE]

RSS Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

  • 2017/08/15 TALONS Tested on Commissioned U.S. Navy Vessel for First Time August 15, 2017
    DARPA's Towed Airborne Lift of Naval Systems (TALONS) research effort recently demonstrated its prototype of a low-cost, elevated sensor mast aboard a commissioned U.S. Navy vessel for the first time. The crew of USS Zephyr, a 174-foot (53-meter) Cyclone-class patrol coastal ship, evaluated the technology demonstration system over three days near Naval […]
  • 2017/08/11 Disruptioneering: Streamlining the Process of Scientific Discovery August 11, 2017
    DARPA's Defense Sciences office (DSO)-whose mission is to identify and pursue high-risk, high-payoff research initiatives across a broad spectrum of science and engineering disciplines-today announced the first programs under its new Disruptioneering effort, which pushes for faster identification and exploration of bold and risky ideas with the goal of […]
  • 2017/08/11 The Radio Frequency Spectrum + Machine Learning = A New Wave in Radio Technology August 11, 2017
    The current wave of artificial intelligence, driven by machine learning (ML) techniques, is all the rage, and for good reason. With sufficient training on digitized writing, spoken words, images, video streams, and other digital content, ML has become the basis of voice recognition, self-driving cars, and other previously only-imagined capabilities.
  • 2017/08/04 Strategic Technology Office Outlines Vision for “Mosaic Warfare” August 4, 2017
    DARPA's Strategic Technology Office (STO) this week unveiled its updated approach to winning or deterring future conflicts during Sync with STO Day, held in Arlington, Virginia. At the event-which attracted about 300 innovators and entrepreneurs, more than half of whom had never worked with DARPA before-STO program managers outlined new areas of interes […]
  • 2017/07/19 Building the Safe Genes Toolkit July 19, 2017
    DARPA created the Safe Genes program to gain a fundamental understanding of how gene editing technologies function; devise means to safely, responsibly, and predictably harness them for beneficial ends; and address potential health and security concerns related to their accidental or intentional misuse.

ADVERTISEMENT

RSS Cyber News (Google)

  • Petya ransomware: Cyber attack costs could hit $300m for shipping giant Maersk - ZDNet August 16, 2017
    ZDNetPetya ransomware: Cyber attack costs could hit $300m for shipping giant MaerskZDNetFalling victim to the global Petya cyber attack is set to cost Maersk, the world's largest container ship and supply vessel operator, up to $300m in lost revenues. The Danish transport and logistics conglomerate - which has offices in 130 countries and ...Maersk puts […]
  • In The Age Of Cyber-Terrorism, Every Investor Must Own Gold - Forbes August 16, 2017
    ForbesIn The Age Of Cyber-Terrorism, Every Investor Must Own GoldForbesIn a recent Metal Masters interview with the Hard Assets Alliance, he noted that the biggest geopolitical risk for Americans today is not a conventional war but rather cyber-attacks that could take down the U.S. power grid. In such a scenario, gold ...
  • Scottish parliament hit by cyber-attack similar to Westminster assault - The Guardian August 15, 2017
    The GuardianScottish parliament hit by cyber-attack similar to Westminster assaultThe GuardianIn an internal bulletin, Sir Paul Grice, Holyrood's chief executive, told MSPs and parliamentary staff on Tuesday afternoon: “The parliament's monitoring systems have identified that we are currently the subject of a brute force cyber-attack from ...Scotti […]
  • Och. Scottish Parliament under siege from brute-force cyber attack - The Register August 16, 2017
    The RegisterOch. Scottish Parliament under siege from brute-force cyber attackThe RegisterIn an internal bulletin Sir Paul Grice, Holyrood's chief executive, warned: "The parliament's monitoring systems have identified that we are currently the subject of a brute-force cyber attack from external sources. "This attack appears to be targeti […]
  • Should cyber competition performance be valued like schooling in cyber workforce? - FederalNewsRadio.com August 16, 2017
    FederalNewsRadio.comShould cyber competition performance be valued like schooling in cyber workforce?FederalNewsRadio.com“What we're seeing as part of the U.S. Cyber Challenge is that there is a lot of interest for people to move into cybersecurity, because they see and they hear of the demand,” Karen Evans, former White House IT official and director o […]
  • Financial regulators active in cyber security sans framework - Economic Times August 16, 2017
    Economic TimesFinancial regulators active in cyber security sans frameworkEconomic TimesIt is also planning to conduct annual cyber audits and has established a specialised cell (C-SITE) to conduct detailed IT examination of banks' cyber security preparedness, to identify the gaps and to monitor the progress of remedial measures, the ...and more »
  • Los Angeles Cyber Lab: Unprecedented Cyber Attack Prevention Program - NBC Southern California August 16, 2017
    NBC Southern CaliforniaLos Angeles Cyber Lab: Unprecedented Cyber Attack Prevention ProgramNBC Southern CaliforniaThe Los Angeles Cyber Lab is billed as America's first city-led partnership dedicated to protecting businesses and residents from cyber attacks. The lab will circulate information gleaned from analyses of what the mayor's office called […]
  • A Cyber Security Investment Strategy For The Future - Seeking Alpha August 15, 2017
    Seeking AlphaA Cyber Security Investment Strategy For The FutureSeeking AlphaHaving investments across all areas of cyber security is key to a diverse cyber defense portfolio. Zix, Symantec, and HACK ETF have seen strong growth and profits are expected to continue as the need for cyber defenses grow.
  • SPONSORED CONTENT: IP EXPO Nordic returns to Stockholm & includes Cyber Security - Business Insider Nordic August 16, 2017
    Business Insider NordicSPONSORED CONTENT: IP EXPO Nordic returns to Stockholm & includes Cyber SecurityBusiness Insider NordicNow located at Stockholmsmässan, the two-day event takes place on the 20-21 September 2017 and features is international sub-event Cyber Security Nordic. Mr. Fredrik Reinfeldt, Former Prime Minister of Sweden, will be opening the […]
  • British cyber researcher pleads not guilty to US hacking charges - Reuters August 14, 2017
    ReutersBritish cyber researcher pleads not guilty to US hacking chargesReutersSAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - British cyber security researcher Marcus Hutchins pleaded not guilty on Monday to federal charges he built and sold malicious code used to steal banking credentials. Hutchins, 23, rose to overnight fame within the hacker ...NHS cyber-defender Marcus Hutchi […]

ADVERTISEMENT

RSS Cyber War News (Bing)


ADVERTISEMENT

RSS Cyber Tag (Icerocket)


ADVERTISEMENT

RSS Cyberwar Tag (Wordpress)


ADVERTISEMENT


 
The Art of Attention

© 2016 PROSOCHĒ. All Rights Reserved.
Fair Use Policy ҩ Terms of Service ҩ Privacy Policy ҩ Contact

Cyber Threat Assessment

 


ADVERTISEMENT

In this New York Times bestselling investigation, Ted Koppel reveals that a major cyberattack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared... [MORE]


ADVERTISEMENT

As cyber-attacks dominate front-page news, as hackers join terrorists on the list of global threats, and as top generals warn of a coming cyber war, few books are more timely and enlightening than Dark Territory: The Secret History of Cyber War, by Slate columnist and Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Fred Kaplan... [MORE]


ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Support CSWW

Please help improve CSWW by providing us with your comments, concerns, and questions at our FEEDBACK page.

Editor, CSWW

Kurt Brindley is a retired U.S. Navy Senior Chief who specialized in the fields of tele-communications and C4SRI systems Upon retirement from the navy, he spent nearly a decade as a defense industry consultant. He now writes full time... [MORE]


ADVERTISEMENT

Now in development for film by 20th Century Fox, award-winning CyberStorm depicts, in realistic and sometimes terrifying detail, what a full scale cyber attack against present-day New York City might look like from the perspective of one family trying to survive it... [MORE]